A certification has helped support and promote the tourism sector in Ecuador. Indeed, the country get the WTTC Safe Travels Stamp.
Removal of quarantine sees Ecuador get the renowned stamp Guam. Ecuador is the latest in a long line of major destinations to use the world’s first ever global safety and hygiene stamp, launched by the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC).

Ecuador received its WTTC Safe Travels Stamp, following a major government announcement which will see international travellers arriving with a negative test taken within the previous 10 days, exempt from its 14-day isolation. This move will help reopen its Travel & Tourism sector and provide a significant boost to the country’s economy.
WTTC, which represents the global Travel & Tourism private sector, created the Safe Travels Stamp to allow travellers to identify destinations and businesses around the world which have adopted the global standardised health and hygiene protocols.
The United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) welcomed the WTTC Safe Travels Stamp, which place the safety and hygiene of travellers as top priority.

Rosi Prado de Holguín, Ecuador Minister of Tourism said: “The WTTC Safe Travels Stamp shows that Ecuador has made responsible and technical decisions to encourage travel, guaranteeing everyone’s health and well-being.
“I invite everyone to visit us and enjoy our Four Worlds, Andes, Amazon, Coast and the Galapagos Islands. Rest assured that in these and all other spots, we are looking after your well-being and minimising risks of transmission.”

Since the launch of the WTTC Safe Travels Stamp, destination countries and cities, around the world have now adopted WTTC’s new protocols.
As part of its Safe Travels protocols, these worldwide measures provide consistency and guidance to travel providers and travellers about the new approach to health, hygiene, deep cleansing and physical distancing, in the ‘new normal’ of COVID-19 world.
The protocols were devised following the experience of WTTC members dealing with COVID19 and based on guidelines from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).